Quid ultra?

Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics

Quid Ultra? Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics is a series of monthly prestigious colloquia that aims to present to a broad audience of astrophysicists, PhD and master students some of the most controversial topics at the forefront of research by internationally recognized experts.

The topics that will be proposed range from the search for exo-planets and astro-chemical traces of the origin of life, to star formation, in the near and distant Universe; from the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, to the complex mechanisms that regulate the evolution of galaxies; from the formation of black holes, to the nature of dark matter and energy and their impact on the observable properties of the Universe.

Next Lecture

Monday 4th of July 2022

Aula Conversi, 16:30 - 17:30

Pascal Oesch, University of Geneva

Our Panchromatic View of Galaxy Build-up at Cosmic Dawn into the JWST Era

The first deep images with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have transformed our view of the Universe. Over the following more than two decades, HST continued to extend our cosmic horizon reaching to only ~400 Myr after the Big Bang at z~11. In combination with other observations across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the rest-frame optical with Spitzer/IRAC, and now all the way to (sub)mm wavelengths with ALMA/NOEMA, we are gaining a more and more complete census and understanding of galaxy build-up across 97% of cosmic history. Yet some critical gaps remain, mainly because (1) our galaxy samples are still mostly rest-UV selected at z>3, and (2) we still only have highly-incomplete spectroscopic information at z>6. In this talk, I will present an overview of our current understanding of star-forming galaxies at z>3 based on our panchromatic view from HST+Spitzer+ALMA/NOEMA data. This will be completely revolutionized over the next months, however, as the first observations with the JWST are being taken. In particular, JWST will provide deep rest-frame optical data out to z=10, both in imaging and spectroscopy, which is truly unprecedented. JWST will thus finally allow us to probe the physics of the first generations of galaxies that ended the cosmic Dark Ages and started the reionization of the Universe.


Meeting ID: 81122901013

Passcode: 686688

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SOC

  • Lucio Angelo Antonelli (INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma)

  • Roberto Capuzzo Dolcetta (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Paolo de Bernardis (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Luca Graziani (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Enzo Pascale (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Francesco Piacentini (AASS PhD Deputy Coordinator, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Raffaella Schneider (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, chair)

  • Nicola Vittorio (AASS PhD Coordinator, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Tor Vergata)

LOC

  • Flaminia Fortuni (INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma)

  • Luca Graziani (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Lorenzo V. Mugnai (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Federico Radiconi (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Federica Sassano (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Alessandro Trinca (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Angela Zegarelli (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Raffaella Schneider (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, chair)