Quid ultra?

Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics

Quid Ultra? Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics is a series of monthly prestigious colloquia that aims to present to a broad audience of astrophysicists, PhD and master students some of the most controversial topics at the forefront of research by internationally recognized experts.

The topics that will be proposed range from the search for exo-planets and astro-chemical traces of the origin of life, to star formation, in the near and distant Universe; from the astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, to the complex mechanisms that regulate the evolution of galaxies; from the formation of black holes, to the nature of dark matter and energy and their impact on the observable properties of the Universe.

Next Lecture

Wednesday 26th October 2022

Aula Conversi, 16:30 - 17:30

Annalisa Pillepich, Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg

Constraining quenching mechanisms via observations and simulations of the gas around galaxies

Large-volume cosmological galaxy simulations, such as IllustrisTNG, provide a holistic view on galaxies and on how their evolution depends on the interplay of internal and external physical phenomena. Among the internal mechanisms, feedback from super massive black holes (SMBHs) is commonly invoked in such numerical models to halt star formation in massive galaxies. In fact, no other mechanism so far has been shown to be capable of returning entire populations of simulated massive quenched galaxies that are consistent with the observed galaxy red sequence and quenched fractions. With simulations like IllustrisTNG we are putting together ever more quantitative and plausible evidences as to the role that feedback from SMBH can have, not only in shaping galaxy structural properties and galaxy populations across 90 per cent of the Universe’s history, but also in regulating the thermodynamical, ionization, and metal enrichment properties of the cosmic gas across halo scales and beyond. In this talk, I will use the outcome of the IllustrisTNG and other simulations in combination with current and future observational data, chiefly SDSS galaxy data and eROSITA X-ray observations, to further our understanding of the tight interconnections between SMBHs, star-formation quenching, and the physical state of the circumgalactic medium.

Meeting ID: 81122901013

Passcode: 686688

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SOC

  • Lucio Angelo Antonelli (INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma)

  • Roberto Capuzzo Dolcetta (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Paolo de Bernardis (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Luca Graziani (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Enzo Pascale (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Francesco Piacentini (AASS PhD Deputy Coordinator, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Raffaella Schneider (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, chair)

  • Nicola Vittorio (AASS PhD Coordinator, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Tor Vergata)

LOC

  • Flaminia Fortuni (INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma)

  • Luca Graziani (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Lorenzo V. Mugnai (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Federico Radiconi (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Federica Sassano (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Alessandro Trinca (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Angela Zegarelli (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Raffaella Schneider (Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, chair)